Saturday, January 19, 2013

Mental ill budget Cuts


National Alliance of Mental Illness

America’s Mental Health Care Future

As a nation, the U.S. is the third highest spender on health care per person, yet our health outcomes rank 37th compared to other nations. We can do better. Even though the economy is in dire condition, our nation will recover. Our nation’s health care system is undergoing a complete overhaul to prepare for better times ahead. A uniquely American approach based on the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) and the Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act (Parity Act) will bring the insurance industry into line and strengthen public/private partnerships. However, NAMI’s advocacy is needed to prevent harmful consequences and ensure the right care at the right time and in the right place to give every child and adult living with mental illness the chance to succeed in the family, school, workplace and community.

Budget Advocacy

Budget cuts today are dismantling state mental health care systems at levels never faced before. NAMI's top advocacy priority is to protect and strengthen state and local public mental health services. (more)

The High Costs of Cutting Mental Health

The costs of cutting the state mental health budgets are high. The lives of the one in four Americans who experiences a mental illness at some point is at stake. Treatment works -- if you can get it.

Without treatment, more people will end up hospitalized, in shelters, on the street, in jail or dead. These are costs that are too high to pay.

Our fact sheets illustrate the impact of an inadequate mental health system on our communities . We can't afford to neglect our investment. Advocates are encouraged to print and use these in their efforts with elected public policy makers, the media and others.

Policy Webinars & Presentations

Managed Care, Medicaid and Mental Health

Mental Health Block Grant

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) has developed two policy framework documents to provide guidance to state mental health authorities and community stakeholders regarding allocation of Mental Health Block Grant (MHBG) and Substance Abuse Prevention and Treatment block grant (SAPT) funding.

Wednesday, January 2, 2013

Does Relapse rate increase during holidays.

From Substance Matter by Dr. Mark Willenbring

It is the grand believe of 12 Step Programs that the Holydays is a great risk to alcoholics and people
with substance dependences.  Here is a study on that matter.

Do relapse rates rise around the holidays?
Mark Willenbring, MD at Substance Matters: - 1 week ago

Many people assume that the time between Thansksgiving and the winter solstice holidays are the most difficult time of the year for people in recovery. Temptations are harder to avoid, what with office and holiday parties, family gatherings, and so forth. Many people with alcohol dependence come from families with many heavy drinkers, so alcohol may be flowing freely, and there may be others who are intoxicated. (Ever notice how boring and obnoxious intoxicated people can be if you're not intoxicated yourself?) So cue-induced craving is certainly an issue, whether your cues are vis... more »